DeepWater Buoyancy Selected for Maine Technology Asset Fund Grant

DeepWater Buoyancy Selected for Maine Technology Asset Fund Grant

Announcement

The Maine Technology Institute announced today that DeepWater Buoyancy, Inc. was selected to receive a grant as a part of the Maine Technology Asset Fund 2.0 program.

The company’s proposal was one of 18 chosen from a pool of 183 in a highly competitive selection process.

About the Grant

Brian Whitney, President of MTI stated, “The Maine Technology Institute (MTI) recently closed its Maine Technology Asset Fund 2.0 (MTAF2.0) application portal and announced that it received 183 proposals from Maine companies and organizations seeking, in aggregate, $381 million in funding.”  The MTAF2.0 program was established to enable organizations to gain and hold market share, to increase revenues, and to expand employment or preserve jobs.

In total, forty-five million dollars ($45,000,000) is being distributed in the form of matching grants to support infrastructure, equipment and technology upgrades.  These MTAF2.0 investments are expected to have a monumental impact on the State of Maine over the next five years, creating over 5,300 new jobs and resulting over $1.3 billion in economic impact.

Expanding Products and Markets

David Capotosto, Director of Business Development, commented, “DeepWater Buoyancy is seeing opportunities for new products in existing markets and demand for our products in new markets.  As such, a substantial capital investment program has begun to upgrade facilities, add equipment, and introduce new processes.  These improvements will also ensure the ongoing support of our existing customers and markets, and allow us to service customers in new applications and markets.” In the proposal for the grant DeepWater Buoyancy noted that they are involved in three of the seven key technology sectors targeted by the Maine Technology Institute (MTI); Aquaculture & Marine, Advanced Composites, and Precision Manufacturing.

Product Opportunities

DeepWater Buoyancy, Inc. has been the world’s largest producer of subsea buoyancy products for the oceanographic industry since its inception in 2013.  Additionally, the company has a vast line of buoyancy solutions for offshore oil & gas, government research, defense, aquaculture and marine markets.  The capital investment program is aimed at facilitating the growth of this line.

The growing line of products is the result of close collaboration with customers and a dedication to application-specific product design and development.  The company’s design philosophy is, “A customer should have a product that meets the application, and not be forced to adjust their application to an off-the-shelf product.”  Whether an iteration of an existing design or a completely new design, the goal is to produce the finest, most appropriate, and cost-effective solution for any given application.

About DeepWater Buoyancy, Inc.

DeepWater Buoyancy creates subsea buoyancy products for leading companies in the oceanographic, seismic, survey, military and offshore oil & gas markets.   Customers have relied on our products for over thirty-five years, from the ocean surface to depths exceeding six thousand meters.

Learn more at www.DeepWaterBuoyancy.com

StableMoor® Buoys Support Ice Studies

StableMoor® Buoys Support Ice Studies

The Right Design

DeepWater Buoyancy’s StableMoor® Mooring Buoys have been chosen to support the “Stratified Ocean Dynamics in the Artic” (SODA) initiative headed by the Office of Naval Research.

The buoys were custom-designed and built to specifications provided by the University of Washington Applied Physics Lab and the University of New Hampshire.  These buoys will support instrumentation that will map the underside of sea ice in support of the research project.

 

About the StableMoor® Buoys

The pair of StableMoor® buoys were over 12 feet (3.5 meters) long in order to house the instruments required for the deployment.  Each unit was equipped with features to allow for an upward-facing ADCP, upward facing sonar, a velocimeter, and three battery housings.  Each unit provides 475 lbs (215 kgs) of buoyancy and is rated for 750 msw.

This product was chosen by the research team because of its unique performance characteristics. Specifically engineered for high current applications, the StableMoor® is designed to reduce drag and increase mooring stability in extreme flow regimes. By decreasing frontal area (compared to a standard spherical buoy) and increasing dynamic stability in high current areas, the StableMoor® minimizes mooring inclination and excursions.

Learn more about the comparison of buoy shapes in differing flow regimes HERE

Learn more about our StableMoor® buoys HERE

The University of Washington team is well acquainted with the value of the StableMoor® design.  These two buoys add to their existing units that they have been working with for the past three years.  Some of these buoys previously supported a challenging NREL project studying high flow/turbulence sites for subsea turbines.

Learn about the NREL application HERE

About the Research Project

From the research paper “Stratified Ocean Dynamics of the Arctic: Science and Experiment Plan – Technical Report APL-UW 1601”, September 2016, by Craig M. Lee et al.

Vertical and lateral water properties and density structure within the Arctic Ocean are intimately related to the ocean circulation, and have profound consequences for sea ice growth and retreat as well as for propagation of acoustic energy at all scales. Our current understanding of the dynamics governing arctic upper ocean stratification and circulation derives largely from a period when extensive ice cover modulated the oceanic response to atmospheric forcing, resulting in weak seasonality, at least within the deep basins.

Recently, however, there has been significant arctic warming (Overland et al., 2016), accompanied by changes in the extent, thickness distribution, and properties of the arctic sea ice cover. Summertime sea ice extent has been declining since at least 1979 (when satellite-borne passive microwave sensors began providing comprehensive ice maps; Perovich et al., 2012), with a trend of –13.4% per decade relative to the 1981–2010 average (Figure 1; Perovich et al., 2015; Thomson et al., 2016). September sea ice minimum extents from 2007–2015 are the lowest in the 1979–2015 period, with a record minimum of 3.39 million sq km in 2012.

Figure 1. Time series of Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent anomalies in March (the month of maximum ice extent) and September (the month of minimum ice extent). The anomaly value for each year is the difference (in %) in ice extent relative to the mean values for the period 1981–2010. The black and red dashed lines are least squares linear regression lines. The slopes of these lines indicate ice losses of –2.6% and –13.4% per decade in March and September, respectively. Both trends are significant at the 99% confidence level. From Perovich et al. (2015).

Sea ice has become younger alongside the decreases in extent (Figure 2). Sea ice thickness typically increases with age, such that the combined trends toward decreasing extent and younger mean age point to a persistent loss of sea ice volume (Kwok et al., 2009; Schweiger et al., 2011). Thinner, younger ice tends to be weaker, more subject to deformation and fracturing, and thus more mobile and more likely to provide efficient coupling between the atmosphere and upper ocean. Furthermore, the growing summertime expanses of open water provide periods when the dynamics might more closely resemble those that govern the upper ocean at lower latitudes.

The need to understand these changes and their impact on arctic stratification and circulation, sea ice evolution, and the acoustic environment motivate the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Stratified Ocean Dynamics of the Arctic Departmental Research Initiative (SODA DRI).

Figure 2. A time series of sea ice age in March from 1985 to the present (top) and maps of sea ice age in March 1985 (lower left) and March 2015 (lower right). From Perovich et al. (2015).

Download the full technical report HERE

Learn more at the research project website HERE

About DeepWater Buoyancy, Inc.

DeepWater Buoyancy creates subsea buoyancy products for leading companies in the oceanographic, seismic, survey, military and offshore oil & gas markets.   Customers have relied on our products for over thirty-five years, from the ocean surface to depths exceeding six thousand meters.

Learn more at www.DeepWaterBuoyancy.com

Sponsoring the MTS Buoy Workshop 2018

Sponsoring the MTS Buoy Workshop 2018

Sponsors and Exhibitors

DeepWater Buoyancy is co-sponsoring and exhibiting at the 12th Annual MTS Buoy Workshop.  The event is from April 9-12 in the University of Michigan Campus in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Hosts this year are the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL), the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR), and the Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS).

If attending, please be sure to come and meet Dan Cote, Sales Manager.

 

Event Details from MTS

It’s all about making critical measurements offshore, and getting data from the oceans and lakes back to shore“.

We are inviting all to join us for the 12th MTS Buoy Workshop at the Michigan League, located on the University of Michigan Campus in Ann Arbor, Michigan, during 9-12 April.  We welcome presenters and exhibitors.

As always, we welcome manufacturers and distributors of components and instrumentation for oceanographic buoy systems to exhibit at the workshop, inviting them to display and discuss their products. Interaction between the workshop attendees and these organizations prove to be beneficial to both.

Our hosts this year are the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL), the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR), and the Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS).

We will open with an Ice-Breaker on Monday night, April 9th at the Graduate Ann Arbor Inn, one of our host hotels in Ann Arbor. The Speaker Program begins at 8 am on Tuesday, April 10th.”

  • Abstract Deadline – Friday, March 9, 2018
  • Early Workshop Registration – Friday, March 2, 2018
  • Exhibitor Application Deadline – Friday, March 2, 2018
  • Early Hotel Discounted Rate at the Graduate Ann Arbor and The Inn at the Michigan League – Friday, March 16, 2018
  • Power-Point Presentations Due – Friday, April 2, 2018

For more information contact Judy… jrizoli@whoi.edu

Or learn more about the event HERE

Send us an email to schedule a visit at the show with DeepWater Buoyancy’s Sales Manager … sales@deepwb.com

About DeepWater Buoyancy, Inc.

DeepWater Buoyancy creates subsea buoyancy products for leading companies in the oceanographic, seismic, survey, military and offshore oil & gas markets.   Customers have relied on our products for over thirty years, from the ocean surface to depths exceeding six thousand meters.

Learn more at www.DeepWaterBuoyancy.com

IN PRINT – Apprenticeship Program

IN PRINT – Apprenticeship Program

Local News

DeepWater Buoyancy was found In Print in Monday’s edition of the Portland Press Herald.  The regional paper highlighted the company’s participation in an apprenticeship program with the local technical school.  As a company staging for future growth, locating and developing skilled personnel is essential.  As such, the company is investing in local students as they begin their journey into the workforce.

Download a PDF of the article HERE    …or read the full text of the article below.  We were also featured on television news.  The video can be seen below the article.

Article

BIDDEFORD — Each weekday morning, Sam Roy heads to work. Alongside experienced welders at DeepWater Buoyancy, he spends five hours polishing, bending and cutting metal. Then he clocks out and heads to class at Biddeford High School.

Sam Roy, left, and Joe Woods prepare parts to be welded at DeepWater Buoyancy. Co-owner Matthew Henry said welders are in short supply. “The best thing we can do for him is show him all the skills he’ll need beyond welding,” Henry said.

Roy’s paid internship at the Biddeford manufacturer of sub-sea buoyancy products is a first for the company and the Biddeford Regional Center of Technology, and is an example of how Maine schools can prepare students to take advantage of a large, unmet demand for workers in the trades.

However, the arrangement wasn’t possible when Roy, 17, first discovered his love for welding because of state labor laws that prohibited teens from working with hazardous machinery. Roy and a bipartisan group of lawmakers first had to change those labor laws.

The revisions to the Hazardous Occupations Law for Minors allow students to work and earn money while enrolled in a cooperative or vocational training program. The changes added an exemption for students under 18 enrolled in a career and technical education – or CTE – program to work for short periods of time under the direct supervision of a fully qualified and experienced adult. The rules require the CTE program to provide basic safety training to students and to continue to oversee students’ education.

Sen. Amy Volk of Scarborough, who proposed the amendment with Reps. Martin Grohman and Ryan Fecteau of Biddeford, said the changes benefit both students and local businesses like DeepWater Buoyancy that are trying to attract skilled workers.

“Welding is a talent that is incredibly important to industry in Maine. That’s why, as a committee, we felt it was important to do everything we could to enable the next generation of students interested in a technical career path such as engineering, plumbing, automotive or nursing, to name a few, to succeed,” said Volk, Senate chairwoman of the Legislature’s Labor, Commerce, Research and Economic Development Committee.

The concept of matching students with local companies isn’t new at the Center of Technology or at the 26 other career and technical education schools around the state, but educators and tradesmen say changes were necessary to give students the experience they need to enter the workforce and fill gaps in trades that have a hard time attracting new workers.

“In the past 20 years, I’ve seen such a great need for skilled labor,” said Jim Godbout, owner of Jim Godbout Plumbing and Heating. “There used to be a lot of families going into the same trade for generations, but you don’t see much of that anymore.”

Building Industry Labor Shortage

There are now more people in Maine aging out of the workforce than entering it because of a large drop in the number of births after the 1980s, according to the Maine Department of Labor. That has left gaps in some industries that are not attracting as many skilled workers as needed.

Those gaps are felt especially hard in the building industry, where the average age of plumbing and heating contractors is now over 55.

“They’re retiring and no one is coming into the trades,” said Alice Ames, executive director of the Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors Association of Maine.

Paulette Bonneau, director of the Center of Technology, said internships allow students to gain real-world experience while also exposing them to career opportunities they can pursue without leaving the state.

“They see there are a lot of cool things happening in Maine they can be a part of. This is key for us in the state,” she said. “There are so many neat things going on in the industry here in Maine.”

Skills Not Learned in School

 Last year, over 90 percent of Maine CTE high school students graduated, compared with 60 percent of their peers, according to a study by Educate Maine and the Maine State Chamber of Commerce. Many students leave CTE centers with industry-recognized certifications and technical certificates that allow them to go right to work out of high school. Some of those certifications can be carried over as credits in college.

The Biddeford Regional Center of Technology is open to students from Biddeford High School, Thornton Academy and Old Orchard Beach High School. It offers 16 courses of study ranging from welding-metal fabrication to early childhood education to business and financial management.

The center last year added a plumbing program that now includes more than a dozen students.

“This is not your grandfather’s vocational school,” Bonneau said. “The technology high school setting of today is focused on academic rigor, work ethic and people skills that traditional high school students often are not exposed to.”

Roy was introduced to the Center of Technology during a technology course he took as a sophomore. The teacher taught Roy and his classmates about multiple options at the center, but it wasn’t until a trip to the welding class that Roy’s interest was truly sparked.

“Something just clicked,” said Roy, who comes from a family of toolmakers and machinists. “I found it more interesting and unique than anything I’d done before.”

Roy said he felt energized to study welding and threw himself into the course during his junior year. Last year, he became the first junior at the tech center to obtain an American Welding Society certification.

Matthew Henry, co-owner and plant manager of DeepWater Buoyancy, said good welders in Maine are in short supply and the company was happy to partner with the Center of Technology so it could bring Roy to work.

“He’s essentially just another employee,” Henry said. “The best thing we can do for him is show him all the skills he’ll need beyond welding.”

Roy doesn’t have the welding skills necessary to do the same work as experienced DeepWater Buoyancy employees, but he said he is constantly learning from his mentor and other workers when he’s on the job. He undergoes the same extensive safety training and also is learning about things like blueprints.

Roy, who will attend Eastern Maine Community College after graduation, said he believes his future career in welding will allow him to stay in Maine or bring him to places like Canada and Alaska to work as a pipefitter.

“With other jobs I’ve had, it doesn’t have the same level of satisfaction of getting something done that benefits other people,” he said.

A Plumbing Career Blooms

The labor law change also allowed Jackson Oloya, a 17-year-old second-year plumbing student, to start a paid internship at Jim Godbout Plumbing and Heating in Biddeford.

Since January, Oloya, a senior from Biddeford High, has spent up to 24 hours a week working with Godbout’s more experienced employees. He earns $12 an hour, but that could go up by $1 or $2 an hour by the end of the summer as he learns new skills.

So far, Oloya’s work has included fixing toilets, repairing a commercial shower at the YMCA and helping a service technician identify and address home heating problems.

After working from 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., he returns to school for classes and to play basketball.

“He’s not just working, he’s doing,” Godbout said. “He’d love to work a lot more and we’d love to have him. He’s super eager to learn.”

Oloya started in the plumbing program at the center during its first year. It was interesting, he said, but it wasn’t until the hands-on part of the course began that he really got excited about his future career.

“I’m not a person who stays in an office all day. I like to put things together,” he said. “I thought of myself 10 years from now and said, ‘I can do this.’ ”

Investing in Young People

Oloya, who was born in Uganda and moved to the United States 15 years ago, said he has found he most enjoys doing repair work because it allows him to help customers directly. He also likes the idea that he can pursue a career in the community where he already lives with his mother and 10 siblings.

In the fall, Godbout will pay for Oloya to attend a 12-week advanced training program with the Maine Energy Marketers Association. Godbout said he is willing to invest in young people like Oloya who have a strong work ethic and are serious about building a career with his company.

Oloya and Godbout will sign a contract saying Oloya will continue working for the company after his training.

“It’s a great opportunity,” Oloya said. “I’m getting my brain working a lot. I’ll learn lots of new skills and I like that a lot.”

Godbout said he is encouraged to see more students becoming interested in the industry, and he thinks the opportunities for paid internships will grow “by leaps and bounds” because so many plumbers and electricians are eager to work with young people getting into the industry.

“It’s a great opportunity for these students,” he said. “You can’t buy an education like that.”

And on TV

The story was also run in video as well.

About DeepWater Buoyancy, Inc.

DeepWater Buoyancy creates subsea buoyancy products for leading companies in the oceanographic, seismic, survey, military and offshore oil & gas markets.   Customers have relied on our products for over thirty-five years, from the ocean surface to depths exceeding six thousand meters.

Learn more at www.DeepWaterBuoyancy.com

Representative Spotlight – ASB Systems in India

Representative Spotlight – ASB Systems in India

DeepWater Buoyancy has the finest international representative network for oceanographic subsea buoyancy.  What follows is the next in a series of articles on our representative groups.  This time we are highlighting our representative in India – ASB Systems Pvt Ltd.  Founded in 1995, ASB is another of our representatives who have many years of experience integrating our buoyancy solutions into subsea moorings and structures. ASB services our customers in this region such as the National Institute of Oceanography and the National Centre for Antarctic & Ocean Research.

 

Introduction

ASB Systems was formed in 1995, with a vision to become a multifaceted company in promoting and setting up a strong foundation for a variety of marine related products. The mission is to build and strengthen the foundation of our principals in the Indian market by creating a perfect passage between principal and the end-user. Since inception, the Company has focused on two key issues: the sale of quality products followed by equally good quality post sale support to ensure maximum uptime and utilization of systems. This, in turn, has attracted high levels of customer appreciation for our timely and efficient service.

Representation

We are the authorized sales and service representative of some of the leading manufacturers of Hydrographic and Oceanographic equipment. Our principals are:

  • Teledyne RD Instruments, USA – Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler
  • Hemisphere GNSS,USA – DGPS
  • Hypack, USA – Hydrographic Survey Software
  • Teledyne Odom Hydrographic, USA – Multi-beam & Single Beam Echo Sounders
  • Wartsila ELAC Nautik GmbH, Germany – Multi-beam Echosounders
  • Teledyne Benthos, USA – Acoustic Modems & Releases, Glass Floats
  • SMC Ship Motion Control, Malta – Motion Sensors
  • SBG Systems, France – MEMS IMU
  • SevenCs, Germany – Electronic Charts
  • CODAR Ocean Sensors, USA – Ocean Surface Current & Wave Monitoring
  • Coda Octopus Products Ltd, UK – Echoscope & IMU
  • Deepwater Buoyancy, USA – Subsea Buoyancy Products
  • Innomar Technologies GmbH, Germany – Sub Bottom Profiler
  • Nke Instrumentation, France – Multi-parameter Probes
  • dotOcean NV, Belgium – Instruments for Sediment and Density Measurement

Location and Staff

The Company owns its only premises in Mumbai, in order to maintain strict quality control on our service and have expertise at one point.  ASB Systems is known among Indian clients as a company which delivers quality product and support.  The Service Centre has test equipment (both specialized and normal), documentation, and necessary tool and test equipment to diagnose & repair equipment that ASB sells. The service engineers are periodically trained at our principals’ plants to update their technical skills in order to support contracts, improve troubleshooting, and help in our sales effort.   ASB engineers are responsible for setting high standards of customer support. As a result, the group has always added to the client list and has rarely lost a client.

Services Offered

Sales – Representing OEMs in India for marine research instruments

Warranty Support – To provide service support during warranty period on behalf of OEM

Installation – Installation, Commissioning and Training

Maintenance – Service, Support, Troubleshooting, and Repairs

Our Engineers have the expertise to diagnose defects and provide solutions. Warranty support is provided with clear guidance and support from our principals. Spares as and when required can be arranged ensuring that the lead-time is minimized. ASB Systems also provide Annual Maintenance Contracts for the systems we sell.  ASB engineers keep themselves updated through self-learning programs as well as training organized at the OEM factories.

Over the years, we have provided services to government and private organizations in our field of operation. Effective and efficient support is our prime objective and we make conscious effort to satisfy our customers. We have a long experience in supplying oceanographic products including deep water buoys, ADCPs, acoustic modems, and acoustic releases. Our engineers possess the expertise to integrate these subsea devices and have been ably supporting our esteemed customers for such applications. Whether it is calculating the deployment duration of an ADCP and modem to ensure that the batteries last through the deployment, or addressing a requirement to acquire real-time data from subsea instrumentation, ASB Systems has been proactively providing support for every type of application.

Markets

Principle markets for the company include land and marine survey companies, harbours, container ports, universities, government marine institutes, fish farms, OEM system integrators, dredging contractors, super yachts, racing yachts, marine archaeology, ROV and autonomous underwater/surface vehicles, pilotage, TV outside broadcast, precision agriculture, and fellow marine equipment suppliers and rental organisations.

Our Team Our Strength

Pop-Up Buoy Product Image

Contact ASB Systems Pvt. Ltd.

Gopa Williams   |   gopa@asbsystems.net  |   +91 22 4230 1919 / 1927
www.asbsystems.co.in

About DeepWater Buoyancy, Inc.

DeepWater Buoyancy creates subsea buoyancy products for leading companies in the oceanographic, seismic, survey, military and offshore oil & gas markets.   Customers have relied on our products for over thirty-five years, from the ocean surface to depths exceeding six thousand meters.

For further sales information:  Dan Cote, Sales Manager  |  sales@deepwb.com  |  +1 207 502 1400

For further company information:  David A. Capotosto |  davidcap@deepwb.com  |  +1 207 468 8545

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